THERE IS SOMETHING YOU CAN DO
ABOUT SPOTTED WILT IN PEANUTS!


Albert Culbreath, Jim Todd, Steve Brown, Ron Weeks
John Baldwin, John Beasley, Dan Gorbet, Bob Kemerait and Eric Prostko

S.W.E.A.T. is an unofficial cooperative and collaborative group of scientists representing multiple disciplines, departments and areas of expertise. It includes participants from both research and extension, from The University of Georgia, The University of Florida, Auburn University, and the USDA-ARS. The common goal is simply to solve the problem of spotted wilt in peanut.

S.W.E.A.T. DIRECTORY

We even have one "fictitious" member,
Honorary S.W.E.A.T. member, Dr. Roger Meadows
Calvary Ag Center, Calvary, GA.


Problems with Spotted wilt, caused by tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV), increased dramatically in importance as a problem in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and other important crops in the southern U. S. after 1985. The disease is common across the peanut growing areas of Georgia, Florida, and Alabama and has become THE most important problem for many peanut growers.

The greatest LOSSES to spotted wilt in peanut in Georgia were incurred in 1997. Since then, losses have been reduced substantially. Although natural fluctuations occur, those reductions in losses correspond with a dramatic shift to an integrated disease management program. Currently, there is no one control measure that will solve the spotted wilt problem. However,

THERE IS SOMETHING YOU CAN DO ABOUT
TOMATO SPOTTED WILT VIRUS.



FACTORS AFFECTING SPOTTED WILT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY

  • HISTORY and LOCATION

  • CULTIVAR

  • PLANTING DATE

  • PLANT POPULATION

  • INSECTICIDE USE

  • ROW PATTERN

  • TILLAGE

  • HERBICIDES

  • These factors are listed roughly in order of their importance. Within any given year, there may be huge differences in spotted wilt severity from one area to another, although areas without spotted wilt problems have shrunk dramatically. Cultivar choice has been the most consistent way to suppress spotted wilt epidemics. Typically, use of available moderately resistant cultivars will reduce incidence of spotted wilt by approximately 50% compared to susceptible cultivars such as Florunner or Georgia Runner. Greater reduction may be possible with new cultivars such as DP-1 or Georgia 02C. Planting date is a huge factor virtually every year. However, optimum planting dates vary for a particular year, and shift across years. During the last couple of years, optimum planting date for minimizing spotted wilt has been later than in previous years. The Risk Index has been modified to take that into condideration. Establishment of good plant stands is critical for minimizing spotted wilt incidence and severity regardless of cultivar used. Although most insecticides have little, if any, effect on spotted wilt incidence, use of phorate (Thimet or Phorate) in-furrow at planting has shown consistent suppression of spotted wilt. Row pattern and tillage have also provided consistent suppression of spotted wilt in recent years. Even more recently it has been found that use of Classic herbicide tends to increase severity of spotted wilt. That has been added as a new factor in the Risk Index for 2003.

    SPOTTED WILT RISK INDEX
    2004 VERSION

    This index has been developed to quantify the relative risk of spotted wilt and the reduction of risk of losses to spotted wilt with the use of the factors previously discussed.

    SELECTED PUBLICATIONS ON SPOTTED WILT


    Click on the images below for up-close and personal looks at prominent symptoms of spotted wilt, thrips and thrips damage, and a nontraditional mechanism for thrips control.


    Links to other Peanut TSWV web sites:
    "NCSU Peanut Gallery".
    Texas A&M

      VECTORED BY THRIPS

      Tomato spotted wilt virus and the thrips that vector it have had tremendous impact on agriculture in the Southeastern U.S., as well as the rest of the world. Now, TSWV is a major character in the new novel by South Georgia teacher, gardener, poultry enthusiast, miner of irony, banjo player, NPR commentator and writer, Bailey White. Ms. White's book, "Quite a Year for Plums", originally was titled "Vectored by Thrips", and uses this amazing pathosystem extensively in its wonderfully humorous meanderings down the highways and dirt roads, through the swamps, camellia gardens, heartbreaks, research plots, and peanut fields of South Georgia.



      For more information on any of these or related topics, feel free to contact Albert Culbreath by phone (229) 386-3370, fax (229) 386-7285 or email spotwilt@tifton.uga.edu.


      You are visitor number

      Hit Counter

      since April 14, 1998.
      Thanks for visiting our website!